Susan Baghdasarian | Uxbridge Real Estate, Douglas Real Estate, Whitinsville Real Estate


Moving to a new home can be both exciting and stressful -- especially if pets and young children are involved!

Fortunately, there are plenty of strategies for avoiding frayed nerves and keeping problems to a minimum.

Cultivate a Positive Mindset: Making a conscious decision to remain cool, calm, and collected throughout your move will set the stage for a more relaxed experience for everyone. Since stress and irritability can quickly spread from one family member to another, it's up to the parents to set a positive example for the kids. When you resolve to be patient and optimistic about how things are progressing, you'll tend to be more resourceful, encouraging, and solution oriented.

Be organized: Creating a priority list of tasks that need to be completed by a target date is an excellent strategy for staying focused and on schedule. There are a lot of details to attend to when you're moving, so it's usually necessary to have a written plan and a checklist of things to remember.

Here are three ideas to consider for avoiding confusion at your new home: Clearly label all boxes; make sure that screws and other fasteners for dissembled furniture are stored in an easy-to-find clear bag or container, and take a photo (for easy reference) of cable and Internet connections before disconnecting your TV, sound system, and computer equipment. That way, when everything needs to be reassembled and reconnected at your new home, the process will go much more smootly!

Some people tend to just throw odds and ends into boxes, hoping that all the "pieces of the puzzle" will somehow magically fall into place at their new home. Unfortunately, when you pack your belongings in a haphazard manner, frustration is always the end result.

If you really want to be super-organized, consider drawing a "furniture map" of each major room. That way, you can give copies of the plan to the movers and hopefully streamline the furniture setup phase at your new home. Another efficiency tip is to color-code your boxes to help make sure the right moving boxes end up in the correct rooms.

First-Day Survival kit: Since it's highly unlikely that you'll unpack all your belongings and supplies on the first day, it's always a good idea to pack toiletries, medications, a first aid kit, and cleaning supplies in an easy-to-reach place. Other things you might want to have handy in the car for the first day at your new home would be a vacuum cleaner, pet food, dog leashes, toys for the kids, stuffed animals, games, healthy snacks, and cold beverages.

Miscellaneous Priorities: Digital photographs and computer files can be securely stored on a portable hard drive or a free cloud storage service available through Google or Dropbox. As far as small valuables, such as laptops, jewelry, mobile devices, and important documents, it's generally recommended that you transport those items with you in your car -- preferably in a clearly marked box.


Right now, one version of minimalism drives the tiny house movement. More than simplifying life and being mindful of excess, the move to a tiny home purports to be environmentally friendly, budget conscious, and somewhat Utopian. So, is it just a fad? Or, is it all that and a bag of chips? 

Accentuate the positives

For those living in tiny homes, either mobile or stationary, several advantages make it a great option. One of those is merely having less space in which to gather clutter. Of course, if you're a hoarder personality, the austerity required by most tiny homes might just drive you crazy, or it could cure your gathering habits once and for all. Since most tiny home dwellers subscribe to the "a place for everything and everything in its place" philosophy, making decisions on what and when to buy something filter through that lens. For example, if you buy this, you’ll need to sell that to make room, since they both won’t fit.

Another advantage is budgetary. In short order, full ownership of the tiny home becomes possible. If you build yours from scratch, you can build it debt free, so you end up owning your home outright. Of course, this concept—owning a home that is mobile—is not the same as owning a house on a property that you also own, but it does reduce monthly outgo in many cases. Most often, unless your home sits on your or someone else's property for free, you'll have space rent in an RV park (if your tiny house is on wheels, it’s legally considered an RV) or tiny-house community (several tiny houses built on foundations around a single more substantial dwelling).

There are negatives

As the movement grows, city, county, and state zoning laws need to adjust to allow for the differences in a tiny home from a typical dwelling before they're accepted everywhere. Some locales now have specific codes to cover where tiny houses sit, what connections they require, and other things like egress and ceiling height. So, before you follow the trend to build your own, make sure you know the rules in the location you want to live.

Living in tight quarters can stress relationships. If you're a person that needs time on your own, living by yourself in a tiny house might be perfect. But living with someone else means sharing space all the time. Even bathrooms aren't as private in a tiny home, and by nature, they're incredibly small. In inclement weather, those prone to cabin fever might find the confined space difficult. And when things go wrong (a broken composting toilet, roof leak, or broken appliance, the often feels magnified.

Before embarking on a permanent tiny space lifestyle, consider renting one or living in an RV for a while to see if it’s for you. If you know it’s what you want, then talk to your property specialist about where to buy with favorable zoning laws for your setup.


Moving day; you’ve waited months for this day to arrive, working hard to make sure you, your family, pets, and belongings are ready for the big move.

With all of the preparations and various people involved, it’s easy for moving day to become dangerous.

To ensure that you and your family have a safe and smooth moving day, I’ve provided some tips that every mover should keep in mind.

Make plans for pets and young children

The last thing you want on the first day in your new home is to be wandering around the neighborhood looking for your dog who slipped away during the move. If possible, make arrangements for pets to stay with friends or family for moving day to make things easier.

If you need to bring your pets along, it’s a good idea to put them in a “playroom” with their toys, water bowl, etc. while you have the door to the house open. Not only will it stop them from running out, but it will also prevent you from tripping over them while you carry the couch.

Don’t be a hero

It’s our tendency to want to do a job ourselves if we want it done right. But, when it comes to moving, that philosophy can lead to a thrown out back and a damper on your plans.

When it comes to getting large and heavy objects in and out of the house, make sure you have at least one other person ready to lift with you.

Stack from heaviest to lightest

It may seem obvious, but in the confusion of a move, it can be easy to pack your truck or van in a less-than-ideal way. Rather than playing Tetris with your boxes, try to focus on weight instead. You don’t want heavy boxes near the roof in case they fall on you or on your other belongings.

Place the largest and heavier items in the van first. This will allow you to plan the rest of the load around them, rather than having to move them around to make room.

Take a breather

As tempting as it may be, you don’t have to finish everything in one day. As long as your truck is locked and secure, it’s okay if you don’t bring in every single box. Resting throughout the day and staying hydrated, especially when moving in the summer, will help you stay sharp and ready to keep working.

Have an emergency plan

If you take precautions, you most likely won’t have to worry about emergencies. However, accidents do happen and it’s best to be prepared for them when they do. If you or a family member requires medication, make sure it’s handy and that everyone knows where it is.

Similarly, label your first aid kit and keep it with your necessities during the move.


If you follow these tips, your moving day should be a simple and safe process and you’ll be enjoying your new home in no time.


You probably use online travel sites where you can book your trip as a bundle and save money. You can easily find the best deal when you have flexible travel dates. You can compare many service providers in a very little time. For example, different hotels in different locations without having to navigate to various websites. All in one site where you can take care of most of your travel necessities; a place to stay, vehicle, airfare, and activities. Saving you time on the details and when you book it together can save you money too. These sites are do-it-yourself travel planning.

All Together Now

Traveling as a group on a guided tour in distant lands offers adventure. This option can reduce anxiety about exploring unfamiliar territory. Often, guided trips are pre-packaged and highly structured. Scheduled tours and pre-selected restaurants take the guessing out of your days and allow you to cover more ground in a consolidated amount of time. Your guide and the others in your group may make the trip even more enjoyable, and you may create some friendships that outlast the journey itself. This concept could go the other way and make your trip less than pleasant, and since it is a package deal, you are locked in for the duration. Although you cover a lot of ground during the trip, you may find yourself unable to stay longer at certain spots since the guide will keep the group on schedule as much as possible. 

All-Inclusive Resort or Cheapskate Choice

All-inclusive vacation options are attractive for the budget conscience. A one-price-covers-all can give you peace of mind when you want to relax and not feel as if you must keep shelling out money every time you want to do something. Many all-inclusive resorts specialize so you can look for family-friendly, couples only, outdoor adventure and the like. When planning a vacation remember to budget for tipping, any upgrades you may want, excursions and your airfare. Often you may also need to plan to get yourself to the resort from the airport so check reviews to see what other travelers have experienced. Also, research the restaurants in the resort. Some may require reservations and most enforce a dress code of some kind. Make sure you understand what activities the resort includes and what activities you will need to pay additional fees to enjoy. 

Go online and find your next destination and research how you would like to book that vacation.


If you’ve done even cursory research on selling your home, you’ve heard “curb appeal,” “curb appeals,” and “curb appeal.” Since you know that buyers hear “location,” “location,” and “location,” the best thing you can do to make your location stand out is to flaunt your stuff. That doesn’t mean you have to undertake significant landscaping projects or renovations. Consider a few simple adjustments to your home’s initial presentation to see substantial results.

First impressions

  • Neat and tidy. Before launching into expensive outdoor projects, take a moment to view your home from the street. Better yet, step across the street and take a look at your house and those of your neighbors. Do you have weeds? Is your lawn trimmed? Do you edge it along the sidewalks and flower beds? Do you have dry, yellow, or bare patches? Start with greening up the lawn. Give it some water and fertilizer. Trim it up and neaten around the edge. If you’re considering selling your home shortly, hire a professional lawn service to get your green stuff in top shape.
  • Next, look for cracks, broken hinges, shutters sitting askew, wobbly fence posts and other items that need some maintenance. You don’t need to remodel the outside if you’ve kept it sharply maintained.
  • Check your walking paths. Are there loose bricks or stones? Reset them in place. Is the concrete chipped and broken? You can tackle filling in the cracks yourself with easy mix cement from your local DIY store or hire a pro to repair it for you. Often, you don’t need to tear up the whole walkway; you can fix only the broken section.
  • Hide anything ugly. Often, it’s not what you’ve put in your yard, but things you have no choice about that hinder your curb appeal. If you have utility boxes, meters, and other eyesores that you can’t move, hide them. Place a flower bed with taller bushes to the street side of utility boxes in the lawn, or a couple of potted plants in front of a meter next to the front door. Make sure you don’t block the meter or box itself though since your utility provider needs access.
  • Add some lipstick. Put a fresh coat of paint on the front door and a coordinating color on the shutters. Make sure paint on any trim on the front of the house is not peeling or chipped.

Your property professional can advise you on the first impression improvements to complete on your home, so reach out and seek their advice.




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